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Taxable or Nontaxable?

In Accounting & Finances, Business, Education, Family, Taxes on March 11, 2013 by Sufen Wang Tagged: , , , , , , ,

MH900442285Question Needs to be Answered: Income Tax Basics

You know (hopefully) that federal income tax returns are due April 15. But do you really know what income is – let alone if it’s taxable or non-taxable? Here’s income by the numbers to help you do the math correctly on your returns.

Income can include money, property, or services that you receive. All income is taxable unless the law specifically excludes it – and those “tips” you pocketed are not excluded. You should notice that income doesn’t just mean money: non-cash income received through bartering is as taxable as wages, and both parties must report the fair market value of goods/services received as income on their tax returns. 

MH900361224Although most income is taxable, there are exceptions to this rule. Gifts, bequests, and inheritances are usually nontaxable, so don’t worry about that luxury car given to you for your birthday. If you buy something and get a cash rebate from the dealer/manufacturer, that rebate is also not taxable. Welfare benefits, child support payments, and reimbursements for qualified adoption expenses are all not taxable. Finally, if you collected damage awards for a physical injury or sickness, those are yours to keep, tax-free – nobody wants to kick you while you’re down.

TMH900234599hings get a little tricky with income that’s not taxable except under certain conditions. For example, life insurance proceeds paid to you because of an insured person’s death are usually not taxable. However, if you redeem a life insurance policy for cash, any amount more than the cost of the policy is taxable. Similarly, any scholarship income used for certain costs like tuition and required course books is not taxable, but amounts used for room and board are taxable. And classifying your frat house as  “textbook” college living won’t work.

Don’t forget to report any taxable refund, credit, or offset of state or local income taxes you received, even if you weren’t mailed Form 1099-G. You’ll have to contact the government agency that issued the payment to obtain that form. And don’t miss out on IRS Publication 525, Taxable and Nontaxable Income – it explains everything you ever wanted to know about income.

Wang Solutions, Sufen Wang, M.S. Accountancy, (562) 856-0793

2 Responses to “Taxable or Nontaxable?”

  1. […] The situation and outlook for U.S. dairySoutheast AgNETBank Loan Terminologies and ComputationCash income slump hits saversTop Five Home Business Mistakes You Need To AvoidInternet Business: The Choose Income System – Is it the Real ThingTaxable or Nontaxable […]

  2. Hello you have a great site. I wanna say thanks for posting this interesting articles with us. Keep up great work.

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